What Every Nurse Knows

The only special interests that nurses have are our patients.

Bernie- Born to Run 2016Nurses value life, not just breathing and a pulse, but a quality life that entails an opportunity to fulfill your potential and use your talents and skills.

With the cost of health care premiums exceeding the average mortgage payment for a home, life has been sold to the highest bidder: corporations that profit from you dying.

Why? Because politics are driven by super Political Action Committees (PACS) that spend billions to elect politicians that push special interest groups like healthcare corporations who are more interested in making money than alleviating suffering.

The only special interests that nurses have are our patients. We want healthier lifestyles, affordable medications and compassionate care.

Bernie Sanders is the only candidate that embodies these values. I challenge you to look at Bernie’s track record, study the other candidates’ platforms and show me a leader who can deliver the caring, compassion and community that we need to turn our country around.  Vote nurses values because every nurse knows that life is a terrible thing to waste.

Why Labor Pains are Necessary

 

 The Nurses Nurse will be ON THE AIR
The Nurses Nurse will be ON THE AIR

Why are Labor Pains necessary? That’s what readers of my book will find out. But you don’t have to be a reader to get answers because I will be interviewed on LIVE Radio!

 

That’s right Rita Batchley RN, The Nurses Nurse, is being interviewed on “RNFM Radio: On the Pulse of Nursing “, the most popular internet radio station for nurses. This LIVE interview is on Tuesday, 6/24/14 at 11am PST / 12pm MST / 2pm EST..

During the interview, I plan on discussing my new novel, Labor Pains, and why they are necessary for change. We all think of labor pains as the worse than death suffering of childbirth, but now after twenty-five years as labor and delivery nurse I will share how there is a whole new meaning to what was once dreaded and feared.

This is an interview you won’t want to miss. It will be a live audio and video broadcast via Google+ and Google Hangouts on Air. If you have a Google+ account, you can join the live chat and type in questions for her and the hosts. If you don’t have a Google+ account, you can still watch the live broadcast via the link below or via RNFM Radio’s YouTube channel http://bit.ly/SQJAuw

I’d love for you to listen in, watch, and type in questions if you’re live with us on Google+.

If you can’t listen in, bear in mind that the show will be immediately archived and available for listening at www.rnfmradio.com, and will also be quickly available as a free downloadable podcast on iTunes and on the RNFM Radio YouTube channel.

In my LIVE interview, I plan on discussing Labor Pains, the story of Paige O’Neill,  a labor and delivery nurse, who works at Mercy Hospital where the mysteries of childbirth unfold.

Labor Pains is a must read that is necessary for anyone who wants to know what nurses really do behind the scenes to protect patients from the conditions in hospitals that could harm them.

I will discuss why it is necessary for nurses to be involved in seeing that health care injustice is brought into the light so that consumers can choose wisely.

I look forward to connecting with you then!

Until then, keep pushing to for RNs at the bedside to deliver the safest hospital care.

 

Nursing School 411 an Eye Opener Interview

Here’s a recent article from a web magazine that features your one & only.
I hope you enjoy & pass it on. Thanks.

Rita Batchley is not your ordinary RN. She is a teacher, author and
speaker who happens to believe that nurses hold the key to real
healthcare reform. Since graduating from nursing school over 28 years
ago, Nurse Batchley has helped to deliver more than 3,000 babies and
now, in her breakout novel Labor Pains, she delivers a gripping story
that breathes life into the spirit of nursing. This timely story is
sure to be loved by today’s nurses as well as those yearning to be
delivered into a world where the primary ingredient in medicine is
caring.
As “The Nurses’ Nurse,” Rita has dedicated her life to support nurse
to patient ratio laws and she tells the effects of nursing on nurses
as only someone with her experiences can. Rita contributes essays and
editorials by way of her blog, The Nurse’s Nurse. She has dedicated
her life to support nurse ratio laws.

What event or series of events led you to pursue nursing as a
professional choice?

I grew up in NYC during the ‘70s (think American Hustle); the
inflation and job opportunities were limited. I wanted a career that
was recession-proof. Fiercely independent, I moved to California and
married young. I needed to advance myself in a direction that would
allow me to live anywhere, a job that was as versatile as it is
challenging. One day there was a press release announcing a two year
nursing program at the local junior college. I was always fascinated
with the sciences and the integration of the physical and social
sciences was a perfect fit for me. It took me five years to complete
that two year program but it was worth it. Years later, while pursuing
a BSN I read Suzanne Gordon’s book, From Silence to Voice: What Nurses
Know and Must Communicate to the Public.
Her work sparked a fire that
motivated me to write Labor Pains, my debut novel about a nurse hero.
Name 1 or 2 specific challenges you have faced in your career in
nursing and the steps you took to overcome them?
As a labor and delivery nurse for the last twenty-five years, there
were moments I wanted to give up because I was so discouraged from the
lack of adequate staffing. Instead, I’ve devoted my life to safe nurse
to patient ratios. In the process, so many people have asked why I
chose to write a novel to support this cause, rather than penning a
memoir or citing research. My answer takes me to the very core of
nursing and what resonates most in my practice: the power of people
and the relationships we cultivate by caring. In the 90′s the hospital
industry tried to de-skill nursing by giving our jobs to unlicensed
assistive personnel. I went back to school part time for my BSN which
allowed me to network with a whole new world of nurses that gave me
insight and opportunity. I joined my state nursing association, The
California Nurses Association and I became very involved in leading
the change I wanted to see in nursing. Nurses deserve respect. I
became the chief nurse representative for our 750 nurses throughout
the Ventura County Health Care Agency. Since then I have helped make
enormous changes in our work place due to the passing of our state
mandated ratio law.
Can you give us an example of an interesting case or project that you
have worked on and your role in helping to achieve a positive outcome?

I want people to know what nurses do to protect them, but the silence
of who we are and how we suit up for jobs most people couldn’t stomach
in a million years, is not easy to disclose. In my book, Labor Pains,
this mystery of who nurses are and what we do unfolds. We are
scientists, yet the main ingredient of our medicine intuitively looks
to soothe that certain something that niggles deep within. At the
bedside, in the office or during visits to a patient’s home, it’s the
nurse who gets to know the idiosyncrasies that make each patient tick.
Every chapter strikes a chord right where a nurse lives: in being a
patient advocate.
Now I am working to promote and market Labor Pains because there is so
much further we need to go for the awareness of what nurses can do.
With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, nursing will be on
the front lines for fighting for better access to positive medical
outcomes. Our job to educate others on their options is the key to
starting a social movement for working towards universal health care.

Can you describe what a typical day looks like for you or the
activities you spend the most time on at work?

As a hospital nurse specialist I do a variety of jobs. I’ve worked in
Labor and Delivery doing direct patient care, I’ve worked on our
hospital’s electronic charting system, I teach and I write. The beauty
of a nursing career is that you’ll never be bored. It’s a dynamic
profession that will grow with you as long as you have the willingness
to learn new skills.

What aspects of your work do you enjoy the most?

I enjoy connecting with people. Advocating for nurses and patients,
bringing justice to the forefront, this entire aspect makes nurses
healthcare heroes. When I plant the seed of self-confidence in others
a million roots of positive change take hold.

What advice would you give to new graduates for getting hired after graduation?

Hospitals spend a lot of money to train new-hires. Tell a prospective
employer your commitment to loyalty. Find a hospital that supports
mentoring; get a job at a teaching hospital or one that encourages you
to learn.
What is the key strength you bring to your career and how would you
advise new graduates to mine their own strengths to further their
careers?
I am tenacious. Co-workers told me that hospitals would never change,
that the nurse ratios wouldn’t work. I will continue to work for safe
patient care and improving access to care.
Never give up. Align yourself with integrity, courage and take action.
What you focus on becomes your truth. Choose wisely.

We’d like to thank Rita for being so generous with her time and
sharing her insights and advice with our readers.
Stay tuned nurses: this is just the warm up for the political movement that is erupting across the nation.

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How the Spirit of MLK Guides Nursing Practice

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 I don’t know about you but I cry every time I hear or read Martin Luther King Jr’s, I have a Dream Speech. His words in 1963 still resonate with passion of a world of equality and connectedness where every nurse goes whenever they enter their workplace to care for the sick and needy.

The Caduceus, a more sophisticated sampling of the red cross, has long been a symbol used in nursing, which marks the spot where the sick and injured can be treated without fear of attack. It is the universal sign of neutrality where the most vulnerable have refuge from the fiercest battle lines of hate. Right?

 Not anymore. Sadly, the news is full of stories where nurses are being attacked by angry patients in hospitals, children are being gunned down in schools by the mentally ill and the sick of our richest nation are being relegated to half measures because of lack of funds.

Nurses intuitively know that access to healthcare is the universal level for creating  equality. Let’s face it, you can have all the money and prestige in the world but if you don’t have your health you can’t enjoy it. If you want to build a utopia you have to start with good health. Disease doesn’t care about the color of your skin or the size of your bank account.

Think about it: In medicine a nurse honors the place in you that makes you whole. A nurse upholds that universal world where you are loved as only one of God’s kids can be loved- that place of beauty that place of truth, that place of light. What an honor to share this sacred knowledge with MLK- the place where all hearts beat as one, the place where each one of us has a special purpose in this world.

King’s gifts of commitment to civil rights and non-violent social change have always been used as guidelines for nursing practice. More than ever, our success must rely on MLK’s dream in order to change this healthcare system that’s dying to get better. How simple to apply his vision of unity and courage to our nursing policy and procedures. Among the standards you might address to your healthcare agencies: Do all our neighbors have access to comprehensive healthcare, including mental health? Are the elderly as nourished as they should be? Are the children physically fit and destined for healthy adult lifestyles? These are just a few possible places to continue our nurses’ crusade for healthcare justice.

 It’s time to accommodate King’s Dream, at least on the level of healthcare, and make medical accessibility a reality.  Commit to the Nurses’ Nurse Crusade the dream of quality affordable healthcare for all.  Forward this to a friend, get others to sign up for a subscription to the Nurses’ Nurse Blog and leave your comments to build a strong nursing opinion that becomes the united voice of reason.

 

Next up: the latest update on VCHCA negotiations- the work toward Nursing Professional Recognition

I

If You Don’t Participate Now You May Hate Yourself Later

Members of the New Zealand Nurses Organisation...

For a Limited Time Only, you will have the opportunity to get the deal of a lifetime – How often have you heard that line?

You’ve seen it a million times. Yet, it’s surprisingly true because the time has never been so full of change for public sector nurses. As the expiration date of the contract between the Ventura County Nurses and the County’s Health Care Agency goes further and further off into the sunset the pressure is mounting because of what lies ahead.

As a negotiator on the bargaining team, I can say that talks have been carefully planned as the looming presence of the County’s upcoming conversion to Heath-E-Connect, a new electronic health care record is coming to every public sector health care provider as of July 1, 2013.

This, along with national news is about to put an end to a five year stagnation of wages along with the erosion of pay due to increased contributions toward retirement funds and taxes for county health care workers. Time is on our side, the spark of change is burning and the fuse is running short, the nurses have a stronghold that makes our future bright.

In less than a month Health-E-Connect (Cerner), will go live and in three months, Ventura County will become partners with the federal government to become an insurance exchange for Obama Care. The California Nurses Association Bargaining Unit has not had this many advantages to make our voices heard for better pay and working conditions in a long time. In fact the serendipity of the situation gives me goose bumps, because the time has never been better to draw a line in the sand to propose a financial package that will send the nurses into a happier future.

So NURSES: RNs, LVNs and PSYCH-Techs, Don’t miss out. Come to:
The Cafeteria Conference Room at VCMC to Discuss YOUR future
WHEN: TUESDAY, JUNE 18TH
WHERE: CAFETERIA CONFERENCE RM
TIME: 8 A.M. – NOON

2013: The Year of Nurses Rising, Girl-Power to the Tenth Degree

 

nurses float
2013 Rose Parade, Nurses’ Float .Winner of the Craftsman trophy.

As anyone who saw this year’s Rose Parade can attest, 2013 is the year of women, especially nurses rising.

Sally Bixby, the first RN to be the President of the Rose Parade, encouraged America to see the world through the eyes of a nurse. Women were well represented on the floats and among the participants from all over the globe. This year’s theme– “Oh, The Places You’ll Go!”—had many strong women leading the way. From cowgirl stunt riders, women in the military and, of course, nurses, everyone felt the power of hope and promise that feminine energy gives to others.

The all Nurses’ Float, with the theme “A Healing Place,” made every nurse proud when it won the Craftsman trophy. What an honor to participate and earn this prestigious award on our very first try at representing Nurses’ Values. Beginners luck? I think not.

There’s no mistake that nursing is a predominately female profession. Our ability to heal with skill, compassion, and strength makes nursing the backbone of healthcare. Like Wonder Woman’s shield or the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’s computer wizardry, nurses have super powers to advocate for safety in the middle of the most intense life or death situations.

With the Affordable Care Act looming, nurses are called to duty to set precedent in the direction of healthcare reform. The Nurses’ Float decreed our virtues. Now it is time to lace up our sneakers and take our advocacy skills to the streets to stand up for the value of comprehensive healthcare for all.

We now have a Senate with a democratic majority and more female delegates in Congress than ever before. The stage is set for Nurses Rising and for all women’s voices to be heard as caring, wise, and compassionate leaders who will go wherever we must and do whatever it takes to bring the dream of quality, affordable care to fruition. Now that’s what I call girl power to the tenth degree!

<*%#@ Are You Ready to Be Sworn In?

Did you ever make a promise you couldn’t keep? Maybe you’ve undertaken a project that was too big to accomplish? Well, all other oaths pale in comparison to the one you took when you became an RN and swore to serve the public trust. Here’s a promise for the modern day nurse:

An oil lamp, the symbol of nursing in many cou...
Nightingale’s lamp burns the midnight oil to assist all nurses in their pledge of diligence
I Pledge Allegiance to the World.
And to the United Fellowship of Nurses.
And to Humanity,
 For Which We Stand, One Kingdom
                                                                                      Under God Indivisible.
                                                                    With Libertyand Healthcare for all. Continue reading “<*%#@ Are You Ready to Be Sworn In?”